Category: Recovery

The IFS Model With Eating Disorders: ED is Just a Part of You

Footsteps in Sand of Eating Disorder Recovery Journey Contributor: Brittney Williams, LPC/MHSP at Fairhaven Treatment Center What is a “Part” in the IFS Model The Internal Family Systems Model (IFS Model) focuses on the dynamics of the internal systems of humans. This model considers the nature of the human mind is to be divided into sub-personalities known as “parts.” “Parts” may be described/experienced [...]
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Anorexia Nervosa Treatment – Unique Nutritional Needs

Man drinking sugar-sweetened beverages Anorexia Nervosa is one of the most prolific eating disorder diagnoses, characterized by restriction of food intake, overwhelming fear of gaining weight, and having a distorted view one oneself. Individuals with this disorder have unique nutritional needs that must be considered in their treatment. A starved body results in a starved brain that can impact [...]
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It is Possible That I Have an Eating Disorder

Woman in the grass Recovering from an eating disorder is not an overnight process. You don’t just wake up one day, decide to get better, and magically recover at that moment. Rather, recovery is a unique journey that involves five different stages. The first stage, called the Pre-contemplation Stage, involves the individual denying they have an eating disorder and [...]
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I Do Not Have an Eating Disorder

Woman standing on shore Is your loved one displaying signs and symptoms of an eating disorder but refusing to admit they have a problem? Denial is a common part of early eating disorder (ED) recovery, and while this stage can be frustrating, there are numerous things you can do to help your loved ones recognize their illness and encourage [...]
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An Introduction to Family-Based Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa

India woman with her family Contributed By: Dr. Elizabeth Mariutto, PsyD, CEDS and Clinical Director of Eating Disorder Services of Lindner Center of HOPE Puberty is a risk factor for eating disorders, especially among girls (Klump, 2013) and anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any mental health diagnosis (Arcelus et al., 2011). As many parents start to see [...]
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